Category Archives: food and health

Pueblo Food Experience

The video really speaks for itself, but here is a writeup that can be found on the videos page providing a little bit of important background:

“The process of assimilation of Native Americans by the outside world, which started centuries ago, continues to this day. One aspect of this continued assimilation is the change in traditional diets. As a result, our health has suffered greatly. Diabetes, cancer, kidney and liver failure, hormonal imbalances, inflammation, allergies, obesity, alcohol and drug addictions are but a few of the symptoms of living in this modern time. One can blame some of this on the environment and life styles, but much these symptoms come from what we put in our mouths. Native peoples are particularly susceptible to diabetes because of their inability to process refined sugar and carbohydrates. Over-processed and packages foods have become the normal diet. These foods contains high levels of sugar and ingredients that are heavily sprayed with chemicals, bleached, and genetically modified (GMO) which side effects are still being learned. These food products are harming to all people, but the Native populations are being hit the hardest because we were not used to eating European foods. Our bodies have not had the long evolutionary time to adjust and are suffering greatly because of it.

Flowering Tree Permaculture Institute put together a program in an attempt to address some of these health issues. A group of Native volunteers agreed to eat only their native foods for a determined period of time. Their health conditions were monitored. Improvement of their overall health was achieved while encouraging cultural preservation. The results will be used to show how eating this way might improve health. Recipes and food sources are being collected in order to share with others that might want to eat this way also.

floweringtreepermaculture.com

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Loosely Following in the Paleo Theme: How To Peel A Banana Like A Monkey

 

Debunking the Paleo Diet

Christina Warinner dropping wisdom about the paleo trend.

This is just the thing I have been looking for as I study ideas in truly healthy lifestyles. I’m coming to this whole paleo thing late in the game and strongly opinionated. There is much about it that makes sense, and Christina goes over many points that can be taken from our ancestors’ diets and lifestyles.

4 take away points from this video:
  • Christina Warinner doesn’t just debunk, but offers her view on real Paleolithic diet(s)
  • She doesn’t just critique the paleo diet, but tears into the modern diet as well
  • She offers a way forward that is inclusive of as many facts as possible
  • Great point in the critique of Paleo marketing
What I think she does that’s not totally honest is misrepresent the modern ideas of the popular Paleolithic diet. I don’t think it’s proponents would much disagree with many of her points from what I have learned up to now. I wonder what you think of this information, and if you know of other science based info on diet and healthy living that you would recommend.

Coyotes Guide

A long, long time ago, maybe two hundred thousand years ago, and in a few places still today, the native people who lived off their land schooled their children – but they did it invisibly. Our ancestors’ children didn’t go to school. School surrounded them. Nature was a living teacher. There were many relatives for every child and every relative was a mentor. Stories filled the air, games and laughter filled the days, and ceremonies of gratitude filled mundane lives.

This Guide passes on this method of invisible schooling, so that people will connect with nature without knowing it. They’ll soak up the language of plants and animals as naturally as any of us learned our native language. Do you remember learning to talk? Probably not. Spoken language happened around you all the time, and allowed you to experiment with words, make mistakes, and every single day grow vocabulary. Mentoring with the language of nature happens just the same. With stories, games, songs, place-names, animal names, and more, you invisibly and subtly stretch your students’ language edges.

The invisible school of nature proves to be more than just effective, it is also fun, healing, and empowering. Like the Coyote whose methods at first seem unorthodox or even foolish, in the end, it works better than anyone could dream.

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The Connection Between Stress and Weight Gain

Beat Stress, Weigh Less

The Connection Between Stress and Weight Gain
— By Jennipher Walters, Certified Personal Trainer and Fitness Instructor

via http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/wellness_articles.asp?id=1482

These days, it seems that everyone is stressed. We all have too much to do and too little time to do it. Times are tough, money is tight, and deadlines are imminent.

What happens when you’re stressed? You tend to eat more, sleep less, skip the gym and feel rundown. Additionally, stress is linked to a number of illnesses, such as heart disease, high blood pressure and an increased risk for cancer.

No wonder so many of us are gaining weight. A study in the July 2009 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology studied stress related work demands, difficulty paying bills, strained family relationships, and depression or anxiety disorders in a nationally representative group of 1,355 men and women for more than nine years. The overall result? Men tend to gain weight when unable to make decisions at work, learn new skills job or perform interesting job duties. More types of stress affected women’s waistlines, according to the study. In addition to weight gain associated with financial problems or a difficult job, women also gained weight when dealing with strained family relationships and feeling limited by life’s circumstances. Overall, this study found that people who reported increased stress gained more weight if they already had higher body mass indexes. In other words, if you’re overweight already, you’re even more likely to gain weight when under stress.

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